Marketing > Link Development

How to do that: Anchor Text for Internal Link Building ?

(1/1)

Randy:
Hello Hello !

How to use your ANCHOR TEXT and your INTERNAL LINK BUILDING for maximum link juice/power ?

dianna:
Hi,

Internal Links are hyperlinks that point at (target) the same domain as the domain that the link exists on (source). In layman's terms, an internal link is one that points to another page on the same website.

RuskinF:
Internal links are most useful for establishing site architecture and spreading link equity (URLs are also essential). For this reason, this section is about building an SEO-friendly site architecture with internal links.

On an individual page, search engines need to see content in order to list pages in their massive keyword–based indices. They also need to have access to a crawlable link structure—a structure that lets spiders browse the pathways of a website—in order to find all of the pages on a website. Hundreds of thousands of sites make the critical mistake of hiding or burying their main link navigation in ways that search engines cannot access. This hinders their ability to get pages listed in the search engines' indices. Below is an illustration of how this problem can happen:

In the example above, Google's colorful spider has reached page "A" and sees internal links to pages "B" and "E." However important pages C and D might be to the site, the spider has no way to reach them—or even know they exist—because no direct, crawlable links point to those pages. As far as Google is concerned, these pages basically don’t exist–great content, good keyword targeting, and smart marketing don't make any difference at all if the spiders can't reach those pages in the first place.

The optimal structure for a website would look similar to a pyramid (where the big dot on the top is homepage):

link-pyramid.png?mtime=20170104131420#asset:2245:url
This structure has the minimum amount of links possible between the homepage and any given page. This is helpful because it allows link equity (ranking power) to flow throughout the entire site, thus increasing the ranking potential for each page. This structure is common on many high-performing websites (like Amazon.com) in the form of category and subcategory systems.

But how is this accomplished? The best way to do this is with internal links and supplementary URL structures. For example, they internally link to a page located at http://www.example.com/mammals... with the anchor text "cats." Below is the format for a correctly formatted internal link. Imagine this link is on the domain jonwye.com.

In the above illustration, the "a" tag indicates the start of a link. Link tags can contain images, text, or other objects, all of which provide a "clickable" area on the page that users can engage to move to another page. This is the original concept of the Internet: "hyperlinks." The link referral location tells the browser—and the search engines—where the link points. In this example, the URL http://www.jonwye.com is referenced. Next, the visible portion of the link for visitors, called "anchor text" in the SEO world, describes the page the link is pointing at. In this example, the page pointed to is about custom belts made by a man named Jon Wye, so the link uses the anchor text "Jon Wye's Custom Designed Belts." The [/url] tag closes the link, so that elements later on in the page will not have the link attribute applied to them.

This is the most basic format of a link—and it is eminently understandable to the search engines. The search engine spiders know that they should add this link to the engine's link graph of the web, use it to calculate query-independent variables (like MozRank), and follow it to index the contents of the referenced page.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

Go to full version